Data Editing in JASP

Occasionally I get feedback from JASP users who write: “I would like to be able to edit data directly in JASP”. Each time I discuss this issue, however, I can convince our users that the way you can edit data with JASP is smarter. That’s why I’d like to expose my arguments in this blog post. First of all, you…

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Teaching Bayesian Estimation with the Summary Stats Module

Background The JASP Summary Stats module allows practitioners to complement frequentist analyses with a Bayesian alternative, and do so easily and efficiently. As the name suggests, the Summary Stats module only requires commonly-reported summary statistics such as the observed -value and the sample size . The ability to conduct Bayesian analyses from summary statistics is particularly useful when the raw…

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How to Request a Feature or Report a Bug in JASP

This blog post explains how you, as a JASP user, can help improve the program — simply give us feedback whenever something is amiss. Specifically, whenever you notice that JASP cannot execute an important task (e.g., filter cases), you can tell us by issuing a feature request; whenever you notice that JASP malfunctions in some way (e.g., the font size…

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How to Perform a Network Analysis in JASP

Network analysis is a relatively new and promising method for modeling interactions between large numbers of variables. Instead of trying to reduce the structure of the variables to their shared information, as is done in latent variable modeling, we estimate the relation between all variables directly. In this blogpost, we provide a short tutorial on how to do network analyses…

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How to Conduct a Multinomial Test and Chi-Square Test in JASP

The analysis of categorical data has a long history and can be traced back to some of most influential statisticians: Karl Pearson and Sir Ronald Fisher. In 1900, Pearson first introduced the -statistic and thus the initial versions of the now known multinomial test and goodness-of-fit test. Today, the multinomial test and the goodness-of-fit test have become a standard procedure…

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How to Conduct a Classical One-Sample T-Test in JASP and Interpret the Results

The one-sample t-test is used to answer the question of whether a population mean is the same as a specified number, also called the test value. This blog post shows how to perf-orm the classical version of the one-sample t-test in JASP. Let’s consider an example. Testing the Effect of Overeating on Weight Gain Our example dataset stems from a…

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Meta-analysis in JASP

The JASP meta-analysis module was supported by a SSMART grant from the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS), an initiative of the Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA). The new release of JASP supports an extensive arrange of commonly used techniques for meta-analysis. These include fixed and random effects analysis, fixed and mixed effects meta-regression, forest and…

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How to Test Interval-Null Hypotheses in JASP

As discussed on the Bayesian Spectacles blog, some statisticians have an visceral dislike of the point-null hypothesis, fueled in part by the conviction that the point-null is never true. Back in 1938, Berkson (pp. 526-527) already summarized the argument: “I believe that an observant statistician who has had any considerable experience with applying the chi-square test repeatedly will agree with…

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How to Do a Hierarchical Regression in JASP

The latest JASP version, 0.8.3, introduced a plethora of new features, including hierarchical regression. This blog post briefly describes this analysis. In traditional linear regression, predictors are selected that form a statistical model; this model is then compared to the null model that includes only the intercept term. Performance of the specified model is then assessed by metrics such as…

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Exact P-Values Upon Request: Breaking with an APA Guideline

The 6th edition of the APA style manual (American Psychological Association, 2010) states the following on the topic of reporting p-values: “When reporting p values, report exact p values (e.g., p = .031) to two or three decimal places. However, report p values less than .001 as p < .001. The tradition of reporting p values in the form p…

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