How to Do a Hierarchical Regression in JASP

The latest JASP version, 0.8.3, introduced a plethora of new features, including hierarchical regression. This blog post briefly describes this analysis. In traditional linear regression, predictors are selected that form a statistical model; this model is then compared to the null model that includes only the intercept term. Performance of the specified model is then assessed by metrics such as…

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Just Out: JASP 0.8.3 — More Bang for No Bucks

We are happy to report that JASP 0.8.3 is now ready for download. Some of the new features have already been discussed in our previous post. Specifically, JASP 0.8.3 now includes logistic regression, hierarchical regression (i.e., the stepwise addition of predictors), a progress bar, and much more. Improvements in 0.8.3 Added logistic regression Added hierarchical regression Added progress bar to…

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Soon to Appear in JASP: Logistic Regression, Hierarchical Regression, Progress Bars, and More

The JASP team is in the final stages of testing the upcoming version, which is scheduled for release next week. The upcoming version, 0.8.3., contains many new features. My personal favorites: JASP 0.8.3 includes frequentist logistic regression (hat tip to the hmeasure R package for the confusion matrix diagnostics; Anagnostopoulos, Hand, & Adams, 2012). Kudos to Erik-Jan van Kesteren for…

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Don van den Bergh Provides a Sneak Peek at the JASP Network Module: “Interview with a Team Member”

In our series Interview With A Team Member, we aim to introduce the people behind the JASP-project. Today we are interviewing Don van den Bergh, one of our analysts! Don is an analyst at JASP and responsible for the frequentist and Bayesian reliability analysis, the machine learning module, and the network module.   What is your professional background? After highschool…

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Tukey’s Lament: Are Statisticians Living a Lie?

John Tukey is famous. In his youth he coined the term “bit” (as an abbreviation of “binary information digit”), later he promoted exploratory data analysis, and throughout his entire life he worked on a broad range of statistical techniques, some of which carry his name. In 1991, Tukey published the article “The philosophy of multiple comparisons”. The paper starts with…

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Our Open Letter Was Desk-Rejected at JPSP: An Argument for Sorrow, and an Argument for Joy

In a previous blog post I mentioned an open letter that a group of 27 social psychologists, methodologists, and advocates for open science had sent to Dr. Shinobu Kitayama, incoming editor of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition (JPSP:ASC). The letter was motivated by a recent editorial in JPSP:ASC in which Dr. Kitayama stated his desire…

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Introducing JASP 0.8.2.0

Released this week, JASP version 0.8.2.0 brings a number of improvements. For data visualization, the most prominent advance is the extension of the “split-by” functionality (courtesy of JASP team member Erik-Jan van Kesteren). To demonstrate how it works, we plot data from a study conducted at the University of Melbourne in the 1970s, examining the possible relation between hair color…

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An Open Letter to Dr. Shinobu Kitayama

Dr. Shinobu Kitayama, the incoming editor of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition (JPSP:ASC), recently outlined his vision for the future. His main purpose is to “see to it that JPSP:ASC functions as a beacon for the active, field-wide effort toward the constructive, future-oriented, positive transformation of the discipline. It is my hope that engaging in…

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Bayesian Spectacles for Everyone!

On particular occasions I find myself almost indifferent about the distinction between frequentist and Bayesian statistics. Usually this happens on weekends, after a few drinks, when my son has fallen asleep, and I am watching my favorite TV show. In those moments of weakness, I find myself thinking “Why all the fuss — often the two paradigms lead to the…

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